Hundreds of migrants cross the English Channel in a day as Rwanda’s hotel rooms lie empty after a secret EU judge blocked the flight

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Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said he could tear up human rights rules – after a flight deporting migrants to Rwanda was blocked.

The hotels reserved for them were empty yesterday following the decision of an anonymous euro judge. Meanwhile, hundreds more have arrived in the UK from across the Channel.

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Hundreds more migrants have arrived in the UK from across the ChannelCredit: AFP
A plane with seven migrants on board was grounded half an hour before departure

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A plane with seven migrants on board was grounded half an hour before departureCredit: Getty
Hotels reserved for migrants remained empty following the decision of an anonymous European judge

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Hotels reserved for migrants remained empty following the decision of an anonymous European judgeCredit: Reuters
One of the hotels offers an all-you-can-eat buffet and has football courts, basketball courts, pool tables, free Wi-Fi and a fully equipped kids' club.

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One of the hotels offers an all-you-can-eat buffet and has football courts, basketball courts, pool tables, free Wi-Fi and a fully equipped kids’ club.Credit: Reuters
Gashora Transit Center Staff

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Gashora Transit Center StaffCredit: Paul Edwards

The government could even quit the European Court of Human Rights altogether.

Ministers are raging that the court would not reveal the identity of the judge who handed down the ruling at 10pm on Tuesday.

The flight had been given the green light by three different UK courts – sparking fresh alarm that European judges are preventing Britain from controlling its borders.

Despite howls of protest from left-leaning lawyers, charities and bishops, ministers are confident the prospect of being flown to Rwanda under the £120m scheme will deter people from trying to cross the English Channel to reach the UK.

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Yesterday – amid widespread media coverage that the deportation flight had been halted – dozens of migrants boarded dinghies and traveled here.

It is estimated that at least a few hundred arrived in Dover, while some were rescued from the English Channel by rescuers.

More than 1,000 migrants have landed on British shores this month alone.

On the same day the plane bound for Rwanda was blocked, 444 people landed in Britain.

Meanwhile, police have launched a manhunt for a dozen suspected migrants who were whisked away in people carriers after being dropped off in a speedboat on a Devon beach yesterday.

There are fears that smugglers are using this as a new route into the country. The European Court’s decision sparked a furious reaction from MPs.

When asked yesterday whether Britain could drop membership of the European Convention on Human Rights, Downing Street admitted that ‘all options are on the table’.

Such a decision would result in Britain not being a member state of the European Court.

Attorney General Suella Braverman said she was “not ruling out or ruling out anything. . . to achieve our goal. »

Attorney General Suella Braverman said she was “not ruling out or ruling out anything. . . to achieve our goal”.

She added: ‘What people are seeing and will be frustrated and confused by is that a foreign court has apparently overridden the decisions of our domestic courts, parliamentary statute and UK policy designed to meet national objectives.’

What people are seeing, and will be rightly frustrated and confused, is that a foreign court has apparently breached the decisions of our domestic courts, parliamentary statute and UK policy designed to meet national objectives.

Attorney General Suella Braverman

Private government figures have ruled out a referendum on repealing the human rights law and severing ties with the Strasbourg court.

But it is widely accepted in Downing Street that a direct mandate from the people would be needed to take such a drastic step. The European Court’s late judgment saw four migrants – who were already seated and trapped in the Boeing 767 – disembarked from the flight.

Some cabinet members are even telling the prime minister to call an election, with the vow to reform human rights laws at the center of any campaign.

A Cabinet source said: ‘It should be the sole commitment of the manifesto and presented to the country as soon as possible – if it has the balls.’

The European Court’s late judgment saw four migrants – who were already seated and strapped on the Boeing 767 – disembarked from the flight.

The Home Office monitors those who have been released using electronic tags.

Home Secretary Priti Patel told MPs the court hit will not end the policy, although it now faces a delay of months.

She said: “This government will not be deterred from doing the right thing, we will not be put off by the inevitable last-minute legal challenges, nor will we allow mobs to block removals.”

Whitehall sources said planning for the next flight has begun, and it is expected to take off within weeks – pending further legal challenges.

Yesterday, Tory MPs issued a rallying cry to leave the euro court.

Desmond Swayne said: “We’re going to have to grab the nettle and extend the principle of ‘taking back control’ to the Convention.”

Jonathan Gullis fumed: ‘Foreign judges have meddled with our UK legal system and our Parliament.’

And Craig Mackinlay said: “The whole concept that a judge in chambers in Strasbourg. . . overturned a decision of the Supreme Court of this country, and then lower courts along the way, I’m afraid, is a situation that cannot continue.

Yesterday the lawyers who brought the case said ministers should not have been ‘surprised’ by the appeal to the European Court when domestic remedies have been exhausted. secretary inside job shadow

Yvette Cooper told Ms Patel the situation in Rwanda was “a shambles”.

‘MESS’

She added: ‘It is not and never has been serious politics.

It has emerged that Bella Sankey, director of Detention Action, which has helped legal challenges against the Rwandan plan, hopes to stand as a Labor candidate in the next election.

Yesterday The Sun visited the Rwandan asylum camp branded ‘inhumane’ by British activists and found it was more of a holiday resort.

The Gashora Transit Centre, which can be used to process Channel migrants, comprises blocks of air-conditioned chalets with brightly painted balconies overlooking Lake Gashora. It offers an all-you-can-eat buffet and has football courts, basketball courts, pool tables, free wifi and a kids’ club.

Our findings smash claims that sending illegal migrants to Rwanda violates their human rights.

Sources in the African nation have confirmed that none of the militants have visited facilities in the country.

The camp’s deputy director, Fares Riuyumbu, dismissed the idea that the residents are being mistreated.

He said: “They have absolute freedom to come and go as they please. We provide everything they might need and more.

“Most of the people here come from very difficult circumstances and we are very sensitive to their needs. I believe we provide a very high standard of living, a safe space where people can refocus while a permanent solution is found for them.

The center is nestled among £100,000 villas overlooking countryside and banana plantations.

It is home to migrants arriving from countries such as Libya – and said it was not yet known whether it would be used for arrivals to the UK.

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Rwandan government spokeswoman Yolande Makolo criticized activists who called the country inhumane.

She said: “Part of the narrative going around is that Africa is an asshole, for lack of a better word, and it’s not true.”

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said he could tear up human rights rules - after a flight deporting migrants to Rwanda was blocked

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Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said he could tear up human rights rules – after a flight deporting migrants to Rwanda was blockedCredit: Unknown, clear with photo office
Home Secretary Priti Patel told MPs the court hit will not end the policy, although it now faces a delay of months.

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Home Secretary Priti Patel told MPs the court hit will not end the policy, although it now faces a delay of months.Credit: PA
The aim of Rwanda's £120m scheme is to deter migrants from making the treacherous journey across the English Channel in flimsy dinghies

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The aim of Rwanda’s £120m scheme is to deter migrants from making the treacherous journey across the English Channel in flimsy dinghiesCredit: AFP

Who is in charge?

By Mercy Muroki

ANOTHER day, another dirty. In the hours before the Rwanda deportation flight took off, we ended up welcoming another 444 Channel migrants.

A plane with seven migrants on board was grounded just half an hour before departure, following a last-minute decision by some obscure international judges based in Strasbourg, France.

What an affront to our national justice system and our democracy.

When a British High Court judge gave the green light to the flight on Friday, he said there was a “substantial public interest” in allowing the Home Secretary’s plan to go ahead.

He said there was no evidence that migrants would face mistreatment in Rwanda. He was right.

Our own Court of Appeal then upheld that judgment four days later. They were right too. But this ECHR ruling is a green light for more migrants to make the dangerous journey, more tensions here at home, more taxpayers’ money thrown at the problem.

It’s time to restart the conversation about who really governs.

Our democracy and our justice system must no longer be bound by a body that has been so often used as a “get out of jail card” for foreign criminals and terrorists in the past.

The only ones jumping for joy at this decision are anti-conservative activists and smugglers.

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